Open San Diego

We make data about San Diego freely available for anyone to use.

This is our blog.

opensandiego.org

Wanted: Chief Data Officer for America’s Finest City

rwithall:

image

Apply here: 

In support of the city of San Diego’s progress towards implementing an open data policy

http://opensandiego.org/docs/Open-Data-Policy-Support-Letter.pdf

thumbsupviz:

The NPR article says,

Whatever Friday’s monthly jobs report says, it won’t change the big picture. There are roughly 137 million jobs in this country. About two-thirds of those jobs are in private-sector services; the remaining third are split between goods-producing jobs (mainly manufacturing and construction) and government work (mostly at the state and local level).
Here’s a closer look, drawn from the same data that the government collects for the monthly jobs report. (You can see this data, in glorious detail, here.)

This chart is exemplary because its designer has transformed dozens of tables of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics into a simple, easy-to-read graphic. The color-coding is easy to follow at a glance (e.g., blue for government, red for goods, green for services). It’s also a lot more fun to explore than a bar chart.
-AKE

What I think is special about this particular treemap is the labeling. Maybe people insert extra space for the labels, which disturbs the actual graphic proportions of the data. Or, they can’t fit the labels, so they create crazy abbreviations. The transparent larger labels is a really nice touch.
-JS
Agreed. Very nicely done.
-RS

Excellent work from NPR.

thumbsupviz:

The NPR article says,

Whatever Friday’s monthly jobs report says, it won’t change the big picture. There are roughly 137 million jobs in this country. About two-thirds of those jobs are in private-sector services; the remaining third are split between goods-producing jobs (mainly manufacturing and construction) and government work (mostly at the state and local level).

Here’s a closer look, drawn from the same data that the government collects for the monthly jobs report. (You can see this data, in glorious detail, here.)

This chart is exemplary because its designer has transformed dozens of tables of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics into a simple, easy-to-read graphic. The color-coding is easy to follow at a glance (e.g., blue for government, red for goods, green for services). It’s also a lot more fun to explore than a bar chart.

-AKE

What I think is special about this particular treemap is the labeling. Maybe people insert extra space for the labels, which disturbs the actual graphic proportions of the data. Or, they can’t fit the labels, so they create crazy abbreviations. The transparent larger labels is a really nice touch.

-JS

Agreed. Very nicely done.

-RS

Excellent work from NPR.

Experienced statisticians — the least sexy of titles given to people who explore data — are quick to inform the eager apprentice that most of their time will be spent finding, cleaning, and preparing data. The analysis part — that is, the part that feels the most like panning for gold — is a very small fraction of the job.
An insidious assumption exists, promoted by software vendors, that knowing how to use a particular data analysis software product “auto-magically” imbues one with the skills of a data analyst. Even with good software—something that’s rare—this is far from true. Just as with any area of expertise, data analysis requires training and practice, practice, practice.
… it’s not about having the data, but about the ideas and computational follow-through needed to make use of it …
When’s the last time a city did something so exciting that people from every walk of life and every part of town were talking about it? That’s the reaction Google Fiber sparked in Kansas City, and now the excitement — and electrical current of fiber-to-the-home connections — will reach Austin, Texas.
What, if anything, can a city do to help foster its creative community? →

austinkleon:

Affordable housing. That’s not a very sexy answer, but it’s true. If we had universal healthcare and affordable housing, people could be more creative, sleep better at night, and live longer.

Dave Koen interviewed me about my gallery talk and art show in Denton, TX this Thursday. I like the way it turned out.

If you have any Denton tips or food recommendations, hit me up on twitter: @austinkleon

More about the show→

libawr:

good:

This month, we’re doing a special tumblr takeover in support of Neighborday — a global celebration of the people with whom we share space.
Each day, we’ll be sharing helpful tips, tools, and updates leading up to the inaugural event on Saturday, April 27, 2013.
Want to know more? Start by adding Neighborday to your To-Do list and following along good.is/neighboring.
Stay tuned for more…

Big fan of this idea.

San Diegans: do this.

libawr:

good:

This month, we’re doing a special tumblr takeover in support of Neighborday — a global celebration of the people with whom we share space.

Each day, we’ll be sharing helpful tips, tools, and updates leading up to the inaugural event on Saturday, April 27, 2013.

Want to know more? Start by adding Neighborday to your To-Do list and following along good.is/neighboring.

Stay tuned for more…

Big fan of this idea.

San Diegans: do this.

Any data scientist worth their salary will tell you that you should start with a question, NOT the data. Unfortunately, data hackathons often lack clear problem definitions. Most companies think that if you can just get hackers, pizza, and data together in a room, magic will happen. This is the same as if Habitat for Humanity gathered its volunteers around a pile of wood and said, “Have at it!” By the end of the day you’d be left with a half of a sunroom with 14 outlets in it.